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Domestic Policy

A variety of reasons, including demographic change, global migration patterns, economic hardship, and climate change, demand that both Germany and the U.S. craft domestic policies that effectively address their populations’ concerns. This imperative is also seen in the political sphere, as voters make their voices heard in state, federal, and supranational elections.
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Closing the Skills Gap: The Importance of Educating a Diverse Workforce

Issue Brief 55 Anticipated demographic changes in the United States suggest that many communities—and their workforces—will be increasingly minority-based, with Hispanic population growth outpacing other minority groups. Young minorities across …

Working toward Being an Inclusive, Welcoming Home for Immigrants and Their Families

I recently visited Charlotte, North Carolina with a small group convened by the American-German Institute (AGI). The purpose of the trip was to examine how Charlotte, a city with a …

Integrating Refugees into the Workforce: A Shared Migration Challenge of the United States and Germany

When it comes to migrants and refugees, the policy differences between the U.S. and Germany are vast these days. Trump and Merkel seem polar opposites: One trying to halve refugee …

GE CEO: Germany points the way for a U.S. manufacturing revival

In an April 2 interview with Fareed Zakaria on CNN’s “Global Public Square,” GE CEO Jeff Immelt made the case for looking to Germany for clues to reviving manufacturing in hard-hit …

Integrating Young Minorities into the Workforce: Lessons from Charlotte, NC

Dr. Ryan Monroe is Chief Academic Officer at Carlos Rosario School in Washington, DC.  He was a participant in AGI’s site visits in Charlotte, NC, as part of the Institute’s …

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What the United States Can Learn from Germany: Workforce Training and Public Investment

Political tensions between Germany and the U.S. promptly resurfaced not long after the new administration took possession of the White House. Many will argue at length about who is right …

Why International Leadership is Slipping Through America’s Hands

Amid the many controversies roiling Washington these days, there is a troubling trend that is greater than the sum of the parts: America’s singular leadership role, held with minimal challenge …

After Warily Circling, Trump and Angela Merkel Prepare to Meet

In this article in the New York Times, Dr. Jackson Janes weighs in on expectations for Merkel’s March 14 visit with Trump, noting that a number of corporate CEOs will …

From the AGI Bookshelf: What Is Populism?

With the ripple effect of Donald Trump’s election still being felt not only in the U.S., but all over the world, many are scrambling to find explanations for how that …

The New Parameters of German Foreign Policy

The election of Donald Trump threatens to radically change the parameters of German foreign policy that go back to the foundation of the Federal Republic in 1949. Germany has benefited …

Berlin’s New Pragmatism in an Era of Radical Uncertainty

Germany has emerged as the EU’s central economic and political power in today’s crisis-ridden Europe. The U.K., after the Brexit vote, has probably dropped out of global crisis management for …

Looking to Germany: What Berlin Can and Can’t Do for the Liberal Order

With U.S. President Donald Trump poised to pull the United States back from global leadership and with the United Kingdom mired in a messy withdrawal from the European Union, Germany …